cool

itsintheblood:

"Believe to the end, even if all men went astray and you were left the only one faithful… And if two of you are gathering together–then there is a whole world, a world of living love"

Gravy

apoemaday:

by Raymond Carver

No other word will do. For that’s what it was.
Gravy.
Gravy, these past ten years.
Alive, sober, working, loving, and
being loved by a good woman. Eleven years
ago he was told he had six months to live
at the rate he was going. And he was going
nowhere but down. So he changed…

drousselle:

Paris, 2014

drousselle:

Paris, 2014

The Agonizing Last Words of Programmer Bill Zeller

(Source: itsintheblood)

itsintheblood:

if you dig this, check out dis hahahoho

A Riddle Song

apoemaday:

by Walt Whitman

That which eludes this verse and any verse,
Unheard by sharpest ear, unform’d in clearest eye or cunningest mind,
Nor lore nor fame, nor happiness nor wealth,
And yet the pulse of every heart and life throughout the world
incessantly,
Which you and I and all pursuing ever…

(Source: americangiant)

"It is a risk to love. What if it doesn’t work out? Ah, but what if it does."

(Source: americangiant)

Harnessing the power of your emotions

Let go of how people should act and what people should do. This step is all about managing expectations. Too often, we have very specific ideas of how people should act and what people should do, and then we get annoyed when they fail to live up to our expectations. “Common standards of decency,” we say. While expecting others to be fundamentally decent is a worthy idea, it can cause real annoyance and, sometimes, unhappiness. There’s another way to do it:
Set low expectations. Don’t lose faith in humanity, but don’t expect people to wow you with their manners, their thoughtfulness, their speech. When you don’t expect a lot from others to begin with, you appreciate it more when they do. Setting reasonable expectations is a major key to being less annoyed.
Ask yourself — what’s in it for me? ”What do I get out of being annoyed?” If you think about it, it’s probably not all that much. Maybe you feel superior to the other person. But do you really want your judgment of who you are to derive from what other people do, or what you do? Your identity will be a lot stronger if you base it off of what you do, not what others do.